Third Punic War Battles > Battle of the Port of Carthage

Battle of the Port of Carthage

Punic Wars - Punic Wars Decoration

Third Punic War

  • Part of the Punic Wars
  • Date: 149 BC - 146 BC
  • Location: Hills outside Adis
  • Victor: Roman Republic
  • Results: The destruction of Carth, annexation of all Carthaginian territories, and collapse of Punic civilization. Rome gains control over the entire Mediterranean Sea.

Combatants

Carthaginians

Commanders

Roman Republic

Commanders

Military Forces

  • Unknown
  • 80,000 Infantry

Aftermath

  • 150,000 - 250,000 Killed
  • 50,000 Enslaved
  • Unknown
Battle of Port of Carthage Part of the Third Punic War Date 147 BC Location Gulf of Tunis, Tunisia Result Carthaginian victory Belligerents Spqrstone.jpg Roman Republic Carthage standard.svg Carthage Commanders and leaders Spqrstone.jpg Publius Cornelius Scipio Aemilianus Africanus Numantinus Spqrstone.jpg Lucius Hostilius Mancinus Carthage standard.svg Hasdrubal the Boeotarch Strength unknown 50 ships

Background

The Battle of the Port of Carthage was a naval battle of the Third Punic War fought in 147 BC between the Carthaginians and the Roman Republic. In the summer of 147 BC, during the Siege of Carthage, the Roman fleet, under the command of Lucius Hostilius Mancinus kept a close watch on the city from the sea. His warships were reinforced that same year by the forces of Scipio Aemilianus. The Carthaginians managed to find an escape route to the sea that had not been effectively blockaded by the Roman navy and put their fleet of 50 triremes and smaller numbers of other vessels to sea to confront the invading fleet. They met the Roman fleet outside the Port of Carthage, and met with initial success in repulsing the Roman attacks to their ships, inflicting heavy casualties on them. As the battle progressed, the Carthaginians decided to return to port. During this operation, the smaller ships of the Carthaginian fleet blockaded the entrance to the port, forcing the Roman vessels very close into shallower waters. Many of the smaller Carthaginian vessels were sunk, but at dawn, a majority had made it successfully back to port. This small victory for the Carthaginian navy was in no way enough to break the blockade by the Roman navy.

Bibliography

Primary Sources

Secondary Sources

Nowaczyk, Bernard (2008). Kartagina 149-146 (in Polish). Warsaw: Bellona. ISBN 83-111-1270-3. Appian of Alexandria, The Punic Wars, "The Third Punic War"