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Third Punic War > Carthaginian Peace

Carthaginian Peace

Punic Wars - Punic Wars DecorationA Carthaginian peace is the imposition of a very brutal 'peace' by completely crushing the enemy. The term derives from the peace imposed on Carthage by Rome. After the Second Punic War, Carthage lost all its colonies, was forced to demilitarize and pay a constant tribute to Rome and could enter war only with Rome's permission. At the end of the Third Punic War, the Romans systematically burned Carthage to the ground and enslaved its population. The term refers to the outcome of a series of wars between Rome and the Phoenician city of Carthage, known as the Punic Wars. The two empires fought three separate wars against each other, beginning in 264 BC and ending in 146 BC. At the end of the Third Punic War, the Romans laid siege to Carthage. When they took the city, they killed most of the inhabitants, sold the rest into slavery, and destroyed the entire city. There is no ancient evidence for modern accounts that the Romans sowed the ground with salt.[1] By extension, a Carthaginian peace can refer to any brutal peace treaty demanding total subjugation of the defeated side.

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Bibliography

Primary Sources

Secondary Sources

L.Loreto, L’inesistente pace cartaginese, in M. Cagnetta ed., La pace dei vinti, Roma 1997, 79 ff.

Ridley, R.T. (1986). "To Be Taken with a Pinch of Salt: The Destruction of Carthage". Classical Philology. 81 (2). doi:10.1086/366973. JSTOR 269786.

Keynes, John Maynard. The Economic Consequences of the Peace. New York: Harcourt, Brace and Howe, 1920.

A Nation at War in an Era of Strategic Change, p.129.